Return to site

Australian Endangered Animals


Australia has one of the highest rates of mammal extinctions in the world. The beautiful and diverse country has over 500 types of animals on it’s threatened species list. Since 2014 the government has invested more than $425 million to support projects that work towards recovery efforts for the multitude of threatened species. A number of those projects work towards the recovery of priority mammals, birds, and plants that are listed on the Threatened Species Strategy.
 

Furthermore, non-government organisations and philanthropic private groups have made major contributions. There are conservation areas that have been established, safe havens constructed, and collaborative projects funded that support habitat restoration across Australia.

 

Authentic partnerships are vital to helping protect the endangered species of the country. The government must continue working alongside researchers, Indigenous groups, not for profits, and communities. By drawing on everyone’s collective skill-sets, resources, and motivation conservation efforts can be maximised.

 

Here are a few of the threatened animals that these initiatives are hoping to save.

 

Gouldian Finch

The Gouldian Finch is a magnificently beautiful bird. In the 1980’s large numbers of wild Gouldians were trapped for the international bird trade. The bird trade along with habitat changes are to blame for their decline. Gouldian Finches actually relay on controlled fires during the dry season to burn undergrowth so that they can find seeds on the ground. During the wet season, the birds move to an area that has previously been burned. After a fire, the earth becomes lush and provides the birds with the seeds they need for food. The species has begun to make a comeback since burning practices have improved.

 

Black-flanked Rock-wallaby

The Black-footed Rock-wallaby or Warru are marsupials that used to be widespread across South and Western Australia, as well as the Northern Territory. During the day the wallabies shelter in rock piles and caves, living in rocky areas. At dusk, the creatures emerge to eat shrubs, grasses, and even fruits and seeds.

 

Due to the introduction of wild cats and foxes, alongside the changes in fire patterns large amounts of their habitat have been lost. The Australian government has made supporting the recovery of this species a priority alongside 20 other mammals native to Australia.

 

Eastern Curlew

The Eastern Curlew is the world’s largest shorebird. Over the past 50 years, their numbers have declined by more than 80 per cent. Curlews are migratory birds, flying to China and Russia to breed and coming back home to Australia to fatten up. Due to flood mitigation, pollution, and urban development, many wetland areas have been lost, and the results have been devastating for the Easter Curlew. The birds can be particularly stressed by disturbances from humans and vehicles on their beaches. Currently, the Eastern Curlew is one of 20 other birds that the Australian government has prioritised.

Australia has one of the highest rates of mammal extinctions in the world. The beautiful and diverse country has over 500 types of animals on it’s threatened species list. Since 2014 the government has invested more than $425 million to support projects that work towards recovery efforts for the multitude of threatened species. A number of those projects work towards the recovery of priority mammals, birds, and plants that are listed on the Threatened Species Strategy.
 

Furthermore, non-government organisations and philanthropic private groups have made major contributions. There are conservation areas that have been established, safe havens constructed, and collaborative projects funded that support habitat restoration across Australia.

Authentic partnerships are vital to helping protect the endangered species of the country. The government must continue working alongside researchers, Indigenous groups, not for profits, and communities. By drawing on everyone’s collective skill-sets, resources, and motivation conservation efforts can be maximised.

Here are a few of the threatened animals that these initiatives are hoping to save.

Gouldian Finch

The Gouldian Finch is a magnificently beautiful bird. In the 1980’s large numbers of wild Gouldians were trapped for the international bird trade. The bird trade along with habitat changes are to blame for their decline. Gouldian Finches actually relay on controlled fires during the dry season to burn undergrowth so that they can find seeds on the ground. During the wet season, the birds move to an area that has previously been burned. After a fire, the earth becomes lush and provides the birds with the seeds they need for food. The species has begun to make a comeback since burning practices have improved.

Black-flanked Rock-wallaby

The Black-footed Rock-wallaby or Warru are marsupials that used to be widespread across South and Western Australia, as well as the Northern Territory. During the day the wallabies shelter in rock piles and caves, living in rocky areas. At dusk, the creatures emerge to eat shrubs, grasses, and even fruits and seeds.

Due to the introduction of wild cats and foxes, alongside the changes in fire patterns large amounts of their habitat have been lost. The Australian government has made supporting the recovery of this species a priority alongside 20 other mammals native to Australia.

Eastern Curlew

The Eastern Curlew is the world’s largest shorebird. Over the past 50 years, their numbers have declined by more than 80 per cent. Curlews are migratory birds, flying to China and Russia to breed and coming back home to Australia to fatten up. Due to flood mitigation, pollution, and urban development, many wetland areas have been lost, and the results have been devastating for the Easter Curlew. The birds can be particularly stressed by disturbances from humans and vehicles on their beaches. Currently, the Eastern Curlew is one of 20 other birds that the Australian government has prioritised.

All Posts
×

Almost done…

We just sent you an email. Please click the link in the email to confirm your subscription!

OKSubscriptions powered by Strikingly